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Norwood Junction could be renamed

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NORWOOD Junction could be renamed South Norwood under Croydon Council plans.

Paul Scott, Labour councillor for Woodside, wants the name changed because there is nowhere on train maps bearing the area's full name.

But SE25 historian John Hickman is vehemently against the proposal as he believes the name has an important place in local history.

But Cllr Scott said that it would be a positive step towards the area's regeneration and has already raised it at Croydon Council's public transport liaison panel – of which he is a member.

A Transport for London spokesman, which is in charge of the station, said it had heard nothing from the council about the plans yet.

Cllr Scott said: "It's in the very early stages. Whilst the name is known to local people, on any sort of transport map, South Norwood doesn't appear.

"There aren't that many stations which aren't named after the area. This is about jobs and investment and it may be a small step but it is an important one."

Cllr Scott also cited the example of Smitham station which was renamed Coulsdon Town in 2011.

But Mr Hickman, of Albert Road, said a book could be written about the history of Norwood Junction.

It was originally called Jolly Sailor station when it was first built in 1839 and then became Norwood Junction in 1846, not taking the name South Norwood because the area did not become known as such until the 1850s.

Mr Hickman said: "At the very beginning of the 20th century the Selhurst depot was among the three largest in the country. It was controlled from Norwood Junction. The station was an important place of employment especially for those living in John Street, Coventry Road, Sidney Road, Percy Road and Merton Road."

He also pointed to the laws made as a result of events at Norwood Junction. He cited rail worker Stephen Gurr's death in 1889 after a long shift, which led to Parliament making alterations in working practices.

Just two years later, a train crashed through the Portland Road bridge, leading to cast iron bridge building being forbidden in Britain.

Mr Hickman added: "The cost of a name change will run into tens of thousands of pounds what with timetables, tickets, maps, signage & other alterations. And for what? Just for a great station to become like so many others, a point on a compass.

"There's no such postal address as Crystal Palace, but they aren't changing their station's name to Upper Norwood.

"Have the people been consulted? No. Do we want it? No."

Norwood Junction could be renamed


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